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Recent Nabbing of Fake Drugs in China Reminds Consumers Fake Drugs Can Be Made Anywhere

Investigators have discovered counterfeit medications made all over the world, from Ecuador to Montreal.

While the world is still reeling from the news that 65 million bottles of fake medicine were confiscated in manufacturing and warehouse sites in Henan Province, China, officials remind consumers that counterfeit medications are made world-wide

Investigators have discovered counterfeit medications made all over the world, from Ecuador to Montreal.

 

While the world is still reeling from the news that 65 million bottles of fake medicine were confiscated in manufacturing and warehouse sites in Henan Province, China, officials remind consumers that counterfeit medications are made world-wide and that no place to purchase them is safe, except from a legitimate brick and mortar pharmacy or a VIPPS certified online pharmacy.

Investigators in China found dirty manufacturing facility walls covered with fungus, as part of a series of raids conducted by INTERPOL worldwide. And fake medicine facilities don’t just exist in China. In Ecuador, boric acid was found as an ingredient in fake medication, which can cause kidney damage and kidney failure with long-term exposure. And in Colombia, sheet rock and rat poison were ingredients in fake medicines.

There are also fake medicine factories in Europe and North America. In Hungary, methamphetamine was found in fake medication and in Montreal commercial grade wall paint was used to give fake pills color, reports ABC News.

Urologist Dr. Jed Kaminetsky said about the dangers these fake medications bear, “If you’re taking a pill that has rat poison, lead or boric acid you could become potentially very ill from that, and possibly even have a fatal complication.”

In addition, US officers have stepped up enforcement of international shipping of counterfeit medications. In 2010, agents captured 330 shipments of fake ED drugs into the U.S. And so far in 2011, they have intercepted 1200 shipments.

Said Therese Randazzo of US Customs and Border Protection, “A lot of these drugs are ordered over the internet from what appear to be legitimate pharmacies and are shipped directly to the patients by the counterfeiters.”

Consumers should only purchased medication from verifiable, licensed pharmacies either in their neighborhoods or from VIPPS certified online pharmacies. That way they can be sure not get counterfeit and potentially deadly substitutes for life-saving medication.

By S. Imber

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