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Doctors, Do You Know Where The Medication You Prescribed Came From? FDA Wants You to “Know Your Source.”

Doctors, medical office managers, and others responsible for medication purchasing need to know about the FDA’s “Know Your Source” campaign. With the help of a few simple pieces of advice from the agency responsible for guaranteeing medication safety, you can make sure that the prescription drugs in your office are FDA-approved. By sticking with state-licensed wholesale medication distributors you can safeguard the health of your patients and protect your practice from liability as well.

Doctors, medical office managers, and others responsible for medication purchasing need to know about the FDA’s “Know Your Source” campaign. With the help of a few simple pieces of advice from the agency responsible for guaranteeing medication safety, you can make sure that the prescription drugs in your office are FDA-approved. By sticking with state-licensed wholesale medication distributors you can safeguard the health of your patients and protect your practice from liability as well.

In September 2014, The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asked all medical professionals to verify the authenticity of medication they purchase to treat patients. Called, “Know Your Source: Protecting Patients from Unsafe Drugs” , the campaign is designed to appeal to doctors, medical office managers, and other medical professionals responsible for wholesale purchases. It’s goal is to educate about the dangers of purchasing medication from medication wholesalers who do not play by the rules.

The four flyers are intended for the non-clients sections doctors’ offices. Each one demonstrates the various things to watch out for when purchasing medication wholesale.

Beware of Offers confronts the aggressive marketing practiced by rogue medication wholesalers. If the prices are too good to be true, then it probably is not real medication.

Caution! shows how to spot fake medication. Errors on labels, labels not in English, imperfect or puzzling packaging can all be visual indicators that the medication is counterfeit.

Ensure You Receive asks medical professionals to make sure that they only make medication purchases from wholesalers licensed to sell in their state.

Pay Close Attention asks medical professionals be on the lookout for patient feedback such as lack of therapeutic effect or new side effects from familiar medications.

By following the simple rules offered by the FDA, doctors can safeguard both their patients’ health and the security of their medical practice.

By S. Imber

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