On February 13, 2013, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released
their report, “Countering the Problem of Falsified and Substandard Drugs” that
reviews the current state of substandard and falsified drugs globally, and offers
a series of recommendations to combat drug falsification and to encourage
global cooperation on drug safety.

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Margaret
Hamburg commends the FDA commissioned report because it “spotlights a critical global public health
issue. Falsified and substandard medicines adversely affect the lives of
millions around the world, and the issue must be elevated to the highest levels
of international discourse.”

Kubic

On February 13, 2013, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released
their report, “Countering the Problem of Falsified and Substandard Drugs” that
reviews the current state of substandard and falsified drugs globally, and offers
a series of recommendations to combat drug falsification and to encourage
global cooperation on drug safety.

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Margaret
Hamburg commends the FDA commissioned report because it “spotlights a critical global public health
issue. Falsified and substandard medicines adversely affect the lives of
millions around the world, and the issue must be elevated to the highest levels
of international discourse.”

The IOM recommendations support the FDA’s efforts including developing
a global presence addressing quality concerns in 12 countries in seven
international regions and working with efforts within the World Health
Organization and the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 as the
health arm of the National Academy of Sciences, which was originally chartered
under President Abraham Lincoln in 1863.
The IOM describes itself as “an independent, nonprofit organization that
works outside of government to provide unbiased and authoritative advice to
decision makers and the public.”

By S. Imber